Innovative science research in Canada is dying a silent death

Why should Canadians care about fundamental research funding? Kelly Marshall McNagny, a professor of medical genetics and the co-director of the Biomedical Research Centre at the University of British Columbia, provides this example:

It’s a question that affects Canadians, even if they may not feel that way. Let’s imagine, say, that a parent takes a child with extreme intestinal pain to the doctor. The child meets the medical dictionary’s description of feeling like he is trying to pass broken glass. The doctor’s diagnosis is Crohn’s disease, an increasingly common illness for which there are few effective treatments other than repeated painful surgeries. The parent experiences an all-too-common outrage: How, in this day and age, can there be no cure for this disease?

This is precisely what funding for basic research from the CIHR is designed to address. A huge reason we, today, live much longer and healthier lives than our parents and grandparents is due to a federal investment decades ago in discovering effective and innovative treatments and cures for a variety of diseases that plagued our ancestors.

Read the full story in MacLean’s

Innovative science research in Canada is dying a silent death
Opinion: Federal science funding continues to be cut, shuttering labs and slowing innovation. And Canadians should be mad.
Kelly Marshall McNagny
August 9, 2017

Innovative science research in Canada is dying a silent death

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *